Eros + Thanatos

Narcissism, etc. Subscribe Archive Theme

I'm Sebastian. Introverted, queer, eccentric. I often find the dark side of life more attractive than the bright, but of most interest to me is how conventional beauty can intertwine with the "ugly" and create something far more beautiful than either is alone. Hence, eros and thanatos, seemingly opposing forces that can contrast with each other in a way that fascinates me.

Be prepared for: genderbending, darkness, depressing images and subjects, socialist politics, the occasional dash of blood or death, NSFW material, and occasional meandering commentary on the things I post.

My other and more cheerful blog is impersonatingsanity.tumblr.com It hasn't been used in a while, but it at least shows that I'm not entirely morbid and insane. I don't mind conversation. I like questions, love things that make me think deeply. Feel free to feed my vanity or encourage my self-deprecation. Know I can take a while to respond, depending on my state of mind at the time. bloodyfab.tumblr.com/ask



Aug. 07, 12

07:52 PM

“I mean, I have the feeling that something in my mind is poisoning everything else."
Vladimir Nabokov (via alecshao)

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

Permalink | 4,067 notes | Tags: quote vladimir nabokov

Jul. 15, 12

07:26 PM

“…as there is in the world not a single human who can speak my language; or, more simply, not a single human who can speak; or, even more simply, not a single human; I must think only of myself, of that force which urges me to express myself."
Invitation to a Beheading, Vladimir Nabokov
Permalink | 4 notes | Tags: quote vladimir nabokov creativity writing literature

Jun. 19, 12

10:27 PM

escolma:

Nabokov’s own copy of Lolita

escolma:

Nabokov’s own copy of Lolita

(Source: littletubofguts, via )

Permalink | 18,201 notes | Tags: vladimir nabokov literature

May. 15, 12

01:35 PM

theantidote:

Nabokov’s Drawings:
“The drawings of butterflies done by Vladimir Nabokov were intended for “family use.” He made these on title pages of various editions of his works as a gift to his wife and son and sometimes to other relatives. In Brian Boyd’s words, “in these highly personal and affectionately playful drawings the scientific accuracy Nabokov needed in thousands of illustrations of the specimens he studied under the microscope was no longer relevant, and his imagination could take flight. In the butterflies Nabokov devised and labeled for Vera he mingles fact and fancy even more sportively than in his fiction. 
None of these drawings portray real butterflies, both the images and the names he assigns to them are his invention. The names often have some connection to the book that the butterflies adorn and, in most cases,  play on words in English and Russian is used: “Paradisia radugaleta”, “Verinia verae”, to name just a few.”
(via magicclouds:)

theantidote:

Nabokov’s Drawings:

“The drawings of butterflies done by Vladimir Nabokov were intended for “family use.” He made these on title pages of various editions of his works as a gift to his wife and son and sometimes to other relatives. In Brian Boyd’s words, “in these highly personal and affectionately playful drawings the scientific accuracy Nabokov needed in thousands of illustrations of the specimens he studied under the microscope was no longer relevant, and his imagination could take flight. In the butterflies Nabokov devised and labeled for Vera he mingles fact and fancy even more sportively than in his fiction. 

None of these drawings portray real butterflies, both the images and the names he assigns to them are his invention. The names often have some connection to the book that the butterflies adorn and, in most cases,  play on words in English and Russian is used: “Paradisia radugaleta”, “Verinia verae”, to name just a few.”

(via magicclouds:)

(Source: printed-ink, via journalofanobody)

Permalink | 5,314 notes | Tags: vladimir nabokov butterflies illustration

Apr. 12, 12

08:01 PM

No Exit: I am convinced that nobody ever saw the world the way I saw it during...

toniiu:

I am convinced that nobody ever saw the world the way I saw it during those moments, in all its terrifying nakedness and terrifying absurdity. Near me a dog was sniffing the snow. I was tortured by my efforts to recognize what “dog” might mean, and because I had been staring at it hard, it crept up to me trustingly, and I felt so nauseated that I got up from the bench and walked away. It was then that my terror reached its highest point. I gave up struggling. I was no longer a man, but a naked eye, an aimless glance moving in an absurd world. The very sight of a human face made me want to scream.

 —Vladimir Nabokov, Terror

The Nausea hasn’t left me and I don’t believe it will leave me for quite a while … I was in the municipal park just now. The root of the chestnut tree plunged into the ground just underneath my bench. I no longer remembered that it was a root. Words had disappeared, and with them the meaning of things.

Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Permalink | 35 notes | Tags: vladimir nabokov jean-paul sartre books

Aug. 08, 11

08:06 PM

“Whenever in my dreams I see the dead, they always appear silent, bothered, strangely depressed, quite unlike their dear, bright selves. I am aware of them, without any astonishment, in surroundings they never visited during their earthly existence, in the house of some friend of mine they never knew. They sit apart, frowning at the floor, as if death were a dark taint, a shameful family secret."

Vladimir Nabokov (via mitochondria)

I love you, Nabokov. Just by virtue of your words.

(via ramirez-dahmer-bundy)

Permalink | 180 notes | Tags: Vladimir Nabokov writer quote death dreams